Imperialism, Sovereignty and the Making of International Law (Cambridge Studies in International and Comparative Law)

This book argues that the colonial confrontation was central to the formation of international law and, in particular, its founding concept, sovereignty. Traditional histories of the discipline present colonialism and non-European peoples as peripheral concerns. By contrast, Anghie argues that international law has always been animated by the ‘civilizing mission’ – the project of governing

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This book argues that the colonial confrontation was central to the formation of international law and, in particular, its founding concept, sovereignty. Traditional histories of the discipline present colonialism and non-European peoples as peripheral concerns. By contrast, Anghie argues that international law has always been animated by the ‘civilizing mission’ – the project of governing non-European peoples, and that the economic exploitation and cultural subordination that resulted were constitutively significant for the discipline. In developing these arguments, the book examines different phases of the colonial encounter, ranging from the sixteenth century to the League of Nations period and the current ‘war on terror’. Anghie provides a new approach to the history of international law, illuminating the enduring imperial character of the discipline and its continuing importance for peoples of the Third World. This book will be of interest to students of international law and relations, history, post-colonial studies and development studies.

Comments

not me says:

Narrow, Expensive “Imperialism, Sovereignty and the Making of International Law” is a thoughtful and eloquent but very esoteric book about the treatment of non-European peoples in international law. Readers should know that it’s not a law book — it doesn’t analyze legal rules or unpack judicial opinions. It’s not a history book, either — the author, Antony Anghie, doesn’t chronicle events and did no research in primary sources. Rather, his book is a meandering political and jurisprudential meditation on how…

Steven Young says:

A brilliant treatise! If you want to know how the … A brilliant treatise! If you want to know how the world works, know how it got there. This book will help you learn that.

literatelady says:

YES! An exhaustively researched and engaging genealogy of international law. This book is an invaluable resource.

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