Legal Outlet

The Nomos of the Earth in the International Law of Jus Publicum Europaeum

The Nomos of the Earth is Schmitt’s most historical and geopolitical book. It describes the origin of the Eurocentric global order, which Schmitt dates from the discovery of the New World, discusses its specific character and its contribution to civilization, analyzes the reasons for its decline at the end of the 19th century, and concludes

Buy Now! $34.95Amazon.com Price
(as of January 23, 2018 10:10 pm GMT - Details)

The Nomos of the Earth is Schmitt’s most historical and geopolitical book. It describes the origin of the Eurocentric global order, which Schmitt dates from the discovery of the New World, discusses its specific character and its contribution to civilization, analyzes the reasons for its decline at the end of the 19th century, and concludes with prospects for a new world order. It is a reasoned, yet passionate argument in defense of the European achievement – not only in creating the first truly global order of international law, but also in limiting war to conflicts among sovereign states, which, in effect, civilized war. In Schmitt’s view, the European sovereign state was the greatest achievement of Occidental rationalism; in becoming the principal agency of secularization, the European state created the modern age. Since the problematic of a new nomos of the earth has become still more critical with the onset of the post-modern age and post-modern war, Schmitt’s text is even more timely and challenging.

Remarkable in Schmitt’s discussion of the European epoch of world history is the role played by the New World, which ultimately replaced the Old World as the center of the earth and became the arbiter in European and world politics. According to Schmitt, the United States’ internal conflicts between economic presence and political absence, between isolationism and interventionism, are global problems, which today continue to hamper the creation of a new world order. But however critical Schmitt is of American actions at the turn of the 20th century and after World War I, he considered the United States to be the only political entity capable of resolving the crisis of global order.

Comments

Reviewer says:

Nehmen sie Nomos, bitte. This is a thorough and fascinating overview of laws and spatial orientations (“Räumsinne” in German) that have both changed and remained consistent throughout millennia. 

Edward Brynes says:

A spacious view of international law Despite its trilingual title, this book is not quite as difficult as it may appear. It is a brief history of international law from a distinctive viewpoint. The ancient Greek word “nomos” is considered by the author to refer to the allocation of land, an act he regards as basic to the establishment of law since land is directly associated with power. “Jus publicum Europaeum” means “European public [i.e., international] law.” The author associates international legal systems with regions of the…

wilde_thing says:

A hard, but interesting read. “Nomos” offers some interesting ideals, particularly about America, that read to be chillingly true when taken from a modern perspective. Written in the 1950s, this work has less of an anti-semetic tone than earlier Schmitt essays, whichmade the reading easier for me to digest. Temper your reading of this novel by remembering Schmitt was a strong supporter of the Nazi party prior to writing this novel, but do not let that steal all the acedemic merit. 

Write a comment

*

Copyright © 2018 legaloutlet.com. All Rights Reserved. 

%d bloggers like this: